Recombinação meiótica: nascimento e morte de uma proteína

sexta-feira, agosto 04, 2017

Meiotic Recombination: Birth and death of a protein

Julie Clément Bernard de Massy Is a corresponding author

CNRS-Université de Montpellier, France

INSIGHT Jul 20, 2017


The ways in which recombination sites are determined during meiosis are becoming clearer following a phylogenomic analysis for 225 different species.

Main text

Each of our cells carry two almost identical copies of each of our chromosomes, one copy inherited from each parent. These small differences, which are mainly caused by mutations, make an important contribution to the genetic diversity observed in humans and other species. During meiosis, the chromosomes from each parent pair up and then swap segments of DNA: this process, which is known as meiotic recombination, is important for diversity and is essential for fertility (Hunter, 2015). An important scientific goal is to understand where recombination occurs on chromosomes, what molecular processes are involved, and how meiotic recombination affects the evolution of the genome.

Many components of the molecular machinery involved in meiotic recombination are similar in fungi, plants and animals. However, some features of meiotic recombination have not been conserved across species. For example, in all yeast, plant and vertebrate species studied to date, meiotic recombination happens at specific regions within the chromosomes known as hotspots. In flies and worms, on the other hand, it happens at many more locations within the chromosomes. Moreover, there are two main pathways that direct meiotic recombination to hotspots.